Chef Jeremy Bearman of Rouge Tomate (NYC) uses mustard blooms for his tartare of Long Island fluke with spaghetti squash, wakame, radish, micro arugula, and micro purple radish.
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Mustard Blooms

Farmer Lee Jones / April 29th, 2013

One of the most important lessons we have learned from chefs is that every stage of a plant’s life brings something unique to the plate. Mustard is an excellent example. As a seed, it’s ground into a yellow paste that’s delicious on a hot dog. As a micro, it packs intense flavor into a minute and delicate green. Its full-size presentation can be eaten raw in a salad or presented as a healthy, savory sauté.

Farmers, for the most part, believe a plant has finished producing once it reaches its flowering stage, so one of mustard’s most unique and most beautiful forms was rarely considered as a desirable ingredient. We, however, learned long ago that a chef’s creativity knows no boundaries—especially when it comes to exceptional flavor—so it was no surprise to us when requests for flowering vegetables like mustard blooms were on the rise.

Chef Jeremy Bearman of Rouge Tomate in New York City harnessed the appetizing possibilities of mustard blooms for his tartare of Long Island fluke with spaghetti squash, wakame, radish, micro arugula, micro purple radish, and mustard blooms. What a beautiful dish to welcome spring!